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Selling the Couch with Melvin Varghese, Ph.D.

Selling the Couch is the podcast for aspiring and current mental health private practitioners. Psychologist Melvin Varghese interviews successful therapists about the business side of private practice (e.g., how they get referrals, their best advice for other practitioners, their daily habits, etc.) as well as the world's top business, marketing, and social media experts to help you become a better business owner. What you get are bite sized, practical and no nonsense tips and advice to guide your private practice and entrepreneurial journey.
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Selling the Couch with Melvin Varghese, Ph.D.
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Now displaying: June, 2015
Jun 25, 2015

Welcome!  My guest today is Nick Pavlidis, who is a husband, father, attorney, blogger, podcaster, author, and a friend of mine.  Nick conducts two successful podcasts:  “Five Minutes with Dad,” and “Confessions of a Terrible Husband.”  As an outgrowth of his blogs and podcasts, Nick has written a book, Confessions of a Terrible Husband: Lessons Learned from  Lumpy Couch.  Nick is here to talk about the writing process because you never know when you may have a book that needs to be written!

Nick’s inspiration for writing came from the realization that he was “a terrible husband.”  Ironically, he THOUGHT he was doing everything right for his family, but realized he wasn’t focusing on the right things.  Nick says of his family:  “I was taking FROM them much more than I was providing FOR them by working so much.”  Nick’s book is the process he undertook to focus on improving his marriage and family life.

He shares the following tips for someone undertaking such a vulnerable writing topic:

  • Consider the “other” person in your relationship and their feelings.
  • Be open, honest, and RESPECTFUL.
  • Determine your mindset, perspective, and ideal reader.  Nick says he wrote “to my best friend with my mother listening.”
  • Write with this question in mind, “What can I do to improve my relationship?”
  • Nick found it helpful to write in “sprints.”  He wrote for blocks of time over a short period, and then took a couple of weeks off.

Nick shares details about the following aspects of the writing process:

  • Organization---Nick found it worked best for him to write huge sections then organize it later.
  • Environment---Nick found the perfect environment for his writing at a local McDonald’s.  No kidding!  Listen to find out why this worked so well for him!
  • Inspiration---Nick found his inspiration through talking to older couples who endured life’s struggles in their marriage.
  • Perspective---You can’t write to “everybody,” but you have to visualize that person or type of person to whom you’re writing.
  • Purpose---You will connect best with readers through a single focus and purpose.
  • Voice---Even though Nick had written countless legal documents and papers in his career, THIS kind of writing was very different.  Find out what helped him develop his conversational tone.

I hope you will join us for these topics and so much more from Nick!  He tells us about his favorite software package for writing and how that helped him in the process.  Whether you think you may ever write a book or not, Nick has great tips for everyone.  Join us!

Links and Resources:

Aterriblehusband.com   ( Nick’s website and podcast)

 

 

 

Jun 18, 2015

Most private practice clinicians have the same aversion to marketing as I do.  Today Ana Melikian reveals the best way to book yourself solid, without focusing on sales and marketing.  There isn't anything that we could make a private practice clinician more happy than hearing those words!

 

Jun 11, 2015

Welcome!  My guest today is Alexandra Saperstein, who is a licensed professional counselor in Portland, OR.  Alexandra has worked in full-time private practice specializing in couples therapy for over five years.

Alexandra worked in Bulgaria for the Peace Corps from 1998-2000.  She gained a philosophy from this work that carries over to her therapy work today.  A Peace Corps supervisor told her, “We want you to work yourself out of a job.”  She tells couples that her goal with their therapy is to “work herself out of a job.”  Her desire is to help the couple, and then send them on to enjoy doing other things with their time and money that are much more enjoyable than therapy sessions!

In our conversation, Alexandra gives insight about the following topics:

  • Alexandra’s interest in couples’ therapy stemmed from the transformation she witnessed in her parents!
  • Couples’ therapy differs in some ways than other therapies because of the pain and level of crisis.
  • Alexandra’s philosophy has been formed by her advanced training at the Gottman Institute in Seattle and her RLT (Relational Life Therapy) training through Terry Real in Boston.  She is an interactive and confrontational therapist.
  • Couples’ therapy calls for longer sessions.  Alexandra offers sessions ranging from 90 minutes to as long as an all-day session!
  • Alexandra offers FREE 15-20-minute phone consultations to help ensure a “good fit” between the couple and herself.
  • Alexandra freely offers referrals to specially-trained therapists in cases of addiction and domestic violence.
  • Most clients are looking for RELIEF from the turmoil of the relationship.
  • The length of treatment time varies greatly from couple to couple.
  • Alexandra is very excited about how RLT training has made her a better therapist.  Listen to find out how!

In the Hot Couch Round, Alexandra discusses her favorite daily habit, online resource, business book, and what she would do if starting over in private practice.  Her one tip for someone starting out in private practice is this: “Don’t be afraid to make a good living, and don’t feel guilty about it!”  Join us for all these topics and SO MUCH MORE!

Links and Resources:

 

Alexandrasaperstein.com

Jun 4, 2015

Ryan Maher explains how private practitioners can use Instagram to get traffic to your website.  Ryan also provides tips and strategies to get more followers and engage with your fans.

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